Contact@gazswebservices.org.uk
+44 0330 043 5176
Mon to Fri: 9AM - 5PM | Sat: 10AM - 4PM

Your cart

Is PayPal and Its Processes Outdated?

We’ve all heard of PayPal and most of us have used it at least once, but some of us have discovered that its systems and its processes are outdated and are not in line with the latest technologies even with its new look and supposedly new policies.

Most of us won’t have an issue with PayPal and most of us use it very often, meaning that billions of £’s, $’s, €’s and other currencies go through its systems every year and it is the most used and most popular payment gateway in the world.

However, some of us have experienced problems with its systems and its outdated ways of doing things, even with major issues like things not being as clear as they should be or not being as clear as we’d expect them to be, we’ve heard of many people having had issues after closing a dispute they’d opened not realising that they couldn’t re-open a dispute once its closed by them. This is something that may be displayed in dialog when closing a dispute but is not clear enough for users to notice it.

This means that PayPal will not help their users after this time, giving users no other options than to contact their card issuers to get their money back, which we should stress you can do, but it also means leaving you with no credit/debit card to use with online retailers for days until a new card arrives through the post.

PayPal insists this is their policy and is down to their systems, however this seems outdated, especially with a lot of the people using the service being the elderly whom don’t realise that as soon as they click close, that is the end of PayPal’s help.

We’ve also been told that you can also contact PayPal via telephone, but they stick to, if you closed the dispute yourself that it can’t be re-opened.

When we spoke to PayPal ourselves regarding this practice, they insisted that if the user closes the dispute themselves, there is nothing they can do, and when we said “Well what about if the elderly close the dispute” they said the same thing, that if the user clicks close him/herself, that’s it.

No matter what, that is what they stick to…. Surely this is well outdated and should be looked at again to be made better and more clear to the user first.

What do you think? Let us know your thoughts on this practice, and what should be done about it!

Virgin Internet Down After Branson Asks For Bale-Out: Is It Connected?

Reports Virgin internet went down tonight have been circling like wildfire on Twitter tonight (27/04/2020) by many, many people…. So Has Virgin’s internet enterprise going down for millions of people got any thing to do with Richard Branson’s well heard of UK Government bale-out of £500m for Virgin Atlantic connected? Its certainly seems strange to us and millions of Virgin Internet users that he got a massive back lash due to him having paid NO tax in the United Kingdom for at least 14 years, including when he decided to sue the NHS.

So… Could this be Branson’s way of saying, you bailout Virgin Atlantic and I’ll switch your internet back on? Sounds like it could be to us and many millions in the UK no matter what part of the United Kingdom your in, basically a big man’s way of blackmail, basically saying you give me a loan and I’ll give some of the UK broadband again.

Richard Branson would describe himself as a philanthropist but surely at least 14 years of not paying UK income tax by holding off-shaw accounts shows him as the exact opposite?

Virgin Media, and Sir Richard Branson haven’t been without contriversy before but maybe this is just the tip of the iceberg and shows what he’ll really do (or try to do) to get what he wants, and when he wants it.

Judge it yourself, but make sure you read this post properly.

The Gaz’s Web Services Team

Google+ and What Happened

First of all lets get started on what Google+ was…


Google+, sometimes pronounced as Google Plus, G+, or G-Plus, was an Internet-based social network owned and operated by Google Inc.. The network was launched on June 28, 2011 which replaced Google Buzz in the attempt to challenge other social networks such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Myspace, Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter and Vimeo and it was designed to link Google’s products like Blogger and YouTube. However, these competitive plans by Google via Google Wave (2009–2010), Google Buzz (2010–2011) and Google+ (Non-G-Suite version) (2011–2019) were never successful and were completely shut down as a result.

The service, Google’s fourth foray into social networking, experienced strong growth in its initial years, although usage statistics have varied, depending on how the service was defined. Three Google executives oversaw the service, which underwent substantial changes that led to a redesign in November 2015.

Due to low user engagement and disclosed software design flaws that potentially allowed outside developers access to personal information of its users, the Google+ developer API was discontinued on March 7, 2019 and Google+ was shut down for business use and consumers on April 2, 2019. It is still in use as Google+ for Enterprise for internal corporate social networks who are users of G-Suite.


Google+ appears to have been performing badly as Google took the decision in late 2018 to close Google+ down for consumers, see below

On October 8, 2018, Google announced it would be ending the consumer version of Google+ in August 2019, later changing that date to April 2, 2019. The company cited low user engagement and difficulties in “creating and maintaining a successful Google+ that meets consumers’ expectations”, noting that 90% of user sessions on the service lasted less than five seconds. It also acknowledged a design flaw in an API that could expose private user data. Google said it found no evidence that “any developer was aware of this bug, or abusing the API” or that “any Profile data was misused.”

According to The Wall Street Journal, the data exposure was discovered in the spring of 2018, and was not reported by the company because of fears of increased regulatory scrutiny. The newspaper said that “the move effectively puts the final nail in the coffin of a product that was launched in 2011 to challenge Facebook, and is widely seen as one of Google’s biggest failures.”

On December 10, 2018, Google reported that a subsequent Google+ API update exposed customer data for six days before being discovered, again saying there was no evidence of any breach. The bug allowed outside developers access to personal information of users. Over 52.5 million users were affected. The company moved the service’s shutdown date to April 2019 and said it would “sunset all Google+ APIs in the next 90 days.”

Google says that Google+ will still be open for G Suite users.


We hope you understand more about the shutdown of Google+.

Google And Blogger

As you may know already, blogger is a free blogging platform which is owned by Google, but what do actually know about the platform? If you’re like us, not much…. So lets try and explain.


Blogger is a blog-publishing service that allows multi-user blogs with time-stamped entries. It was developed by Pyra Labs, which was bought by Google in 2003. The blogs are hosted by Google and generally accessed from a subdomain of blogspot.com. Blogs can also be served from a custom domain owned by the user (like www.example.com) by using DNS facilities to direct a domain to Google’s servers. A user can have up to 100 blogs per account.

Up until May 1, 2010, Blogger also allowed users to publish blogs to their own web hosting server, via FTP. All such blogs had to be changed to either use a blogspot.com subdomain, or point their own domain to Google’s servers through DNS.

As you may know, even after reading this, well not much is know.

What Does My IP Address Show?

Many people think that every separate computer or mobile device have got their very own IP address, but that’s not quite true nor is saying it tells people what you’re called because it doesn’t, but it does list some of the following that maybe you didn’t expect it to show people that have got your IP.

[ninja_tables id=”785″]

and it even shows more than that however they are some of the things your IP shows, so once someone has your IP they can find out certain things but even more can be accessed by the police and other law enforcement agencies.

We hope that by reading this short post, you learnt a lot.

What Does It Mean To Be White Label?

Have you ever wondered what the term White Label means? In this short blog post we’ll explain.

White Label is a term associated with a website or mobile application that doesn’t tell you how it was made, for example if an app was made using an app builder such as AppsGeyser but doesn’t include the AppsGeyser name or branding then it is a White Label mobile application.

We see that many applications these days are not made using HTML code but are instead made using a website company that allows anybody with or without technical knowledge to produce a good mobile application, however many of these apps are White Label. The reason for this is because a White Label application looks more professional than a branded app looks although they could have been made using the same means.

This doesn’t only happen with mobile applications but with websites too although the reason for this is the same.

Learnt something? We hope so….

Behind The PWA

Have you ever heard of a PWA? PWA stands for Progressive Web Applications that make normal websites look and feel more like a mobile app… See more about a PWA below.

Progressive web applications (PWA’s) are web applications that load like regular web pages or websites but can offer the user functionality such as working offline, push notifications, and device hardware access traditionally available only to native applications. PWAs combine the flexibility of the web with the experience of a native application.

The background of the PWA goes like this….

Since around 2005 web development technologies have shifted from static to dynamic web pages driven by server (PHP, ASP.NET) or client side (Ajax) tools, and responsive web design.

Despite apps based on these technologies on devices such as the 2007 iPhone, attempts at web apps failed by comparison to native apps. Native apps provided a better user experience and booted faster compared to having to load in a browser at run-time. Packaged resources and direct access to hardware allowed native apps to perform much faster to provide more features. By mid 2010, however, continued enhancements in HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript, significantly more capable and standard-compliant web browsers, along with powerful processors such as the Apple A10 and Snapdragon 820 made hybrid-apps a viable alternative.

PWA’s are quite new at being used but they’re getting more common, so we hope you’ve learned some things!

ReactJS and Behind It

ReactJS is a JavaScript library language created partly by Facebook for building user interfaces. It is maintained by  developers at Facebook and a community of individual developers and companies globally. React is not very well heard of however, some of the websites it is used on are. We’ll tell you a bit about ReactJS below…

React was created by Jordan Walke, a software engineer at Facebook who was influenced by XHP, a HTML component framework for PHP. It was first deployed on Facebook’s newsfeed in 2011 and later on Instagram.com in 2012. It was open-sourced at JSConf US in May 2013.

React Native, which enables native Android, iOS, and UWP development with React, was announced at Facebook’s React.js Conf in February 2015 and open-sourced in March 2015.

On April 18, 2017, Facebook announced React Fiber, a new core algorithm of React framework library for building user interfaces. React Fiber was to become the foundation of any future improvements and feature development of the React framework.

Although initially released in 2013, ReactJS is not well known to you unless you are a software developer.


We hope this helps 🙂

Behind The Inner Working’s Of Blogger

We have all heard of Blogger and most of us know that it is currently owner and developed by Google however, blogger was originally owned and operated by a company called Pyra Labs before the service was purchased by Google way back in 2003.

Blogger is used not just by consumers but some companies too and you may also find blogs ran using the service but under the domain name blogspot.com although the service using this domain is exactly the same.

Blogger is written in the Python language and was first launched on 23/08/1999. Although Blogger is still active its use is slowly dwindling and may therefore soon be shut down for good, unless Google do something drastic that is.


We hope you have learnt something by reading this post.

The Real Impact Of GDPR

We’ve all heard about GDPR and what it was set out to do but do we really know its actual impact on the affected areas? Probably not, is the answer which is why we are going to find out.


The lead-up to the effective date of the GDPR led to many companies and websites changing their privacy policies and features worldwide in order to comply with its requirements, and providing email and on-site notification of the changes, despite having had at least two years to prepare and do so. This has been criticized for eventually leading to a form of fatigue among end-users over the excessive numbers of messages. Experts also noted that some reminder emails incorrectly asserted that new consent for data processing had to be obtained for when the GDPR took effect, even though any previously-obtained consent to processing is valid as long as it is properly documented and meets the requirements of the GDPR. Unfortunately the GDPR also meant access to many websites outside of Europe was blocked due to the owners and operators not wanting to comply with the new regulation. Phishing scams also emerged using falsified versions of such emails, and it was also argued that some GDPR notice emails may have actually been sent in violation of anti-spam laws. Mass adoption of GDPR privacy standards by international companies have been cited as an example of the “Brussels effect”, a phenomenon wherein European laws and regulations are used as a global baseline due to their gravitas.


Hopefully the effect of GDPR is now a little bit clearer!