Category: Google

Huawei & Google: What This Means?

Have you got a Huawei mobile phone? Okay, nothing to worry about (Yet).

Google have today (20/05/2019) cut the mobile phone giant’s Android licence meaning that any device made by Huawei from now on won’t be using Android and will lack apps such as YouTube, Gmail, Google Maps and many other apps that are used by a lot of people, also Huawei will have to either use another operating system or develop their own.

For those that have an Huawei mobile device already, them users are safe as Android will continue to add much needed software updates and app updates for the foreseeable future but what happens after that is not yet clear.

This follows an order brought in by US President Donald Trump.

Google+ and What Happened

First of all lets get started on what Google+ was…


Google+, sometimes pronounced as Google Plus, G+, or G-Plus, was an Internet-based social network owned and operated by Google Inc.. The network was launched on June 28, 2011 which replaced Google Buzz in the attempt to challenge other social networks such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Myspace, Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter and Vimeo and it was designed to link Google’s products like Blogger and YouTube. However, these competitive plans by Google via Google Wave (2009–2010), Google Buzz (2010–2011) and Google+ (Non-G-Suite version) (2011–2019) were never successful and were completely shut down as a result.

The service, Google’s fourth foray into social networking, experienced strong growth in its initial years, although usage statistics have varied, depending on how the service was defined. Three Google executives oversaw the service, which underwent substantial changes that led to a redesign in November 2015.

Due to low user engagement and disclosed software design flaws that potentially allowed outside developers access to personal information of its users, the Google+ developer API was discontinued on March 7, 2019 and Google+ was shut down for business use and consumers on April 2, 2019. It is still in use as Google+ for Enterprise for internal corporate social networks who are users of G-Suite.


Google+ appears to have been performing badly as Google took the decision in late 2018 to close Google+ down for consumers, see below

On October 8, 2018, Google announced it would be ending the consumer version of Google+ in August 2019, later changing that date to April 2, 2019. The company cited low user engagement and difficulties in “creating and maintaining a successful Google+ that meets consumers’ expectations”, noting that 90% of user sessions on the service lasted less than five seconds. It also acknowledged a design flaw in an API that could expose private user data. Google said it found no evidence that “any developer was aware of this bug, or abusing the API” or that “any Profile data was misused.”

According to The Wall Street Journal, the data exposure was discovered in the spring of 2018, and was not reported by the company because of fears of increased regulatory scrutiny. The newspaper said that “the move effectively puts the final nail in the coffin of a product that was launched in 2011 to challenge Facebook, and is widely seen as one of Google’s biggest failures.”

On December 10, 2018, Google reported that a subsequent Google+ API update exposed customer data for six days before being discovered, again saying there was no evidence of any breach. The bug allowed outside developers access to personal information of users. Over 52.5 million users were affected. The company moved the service’s shutdown date to April 2019 and said it would “sunset all Google+ APIs in the next 90 days.”

Google says that Google+ will still be open for G Suite users.


We hope you understand more about the shutdown of Google+.

Google And Blogger

As you may know already, blogger is a free blogging platform which is owned by Google, but what do actually know about the platform? If you’re like us, not much…. So lets try and explain.


Blogger is a blog-publishing service that allows multi-user blogs with time-stamped entries. It was developed by Pyra Labs, which was bought by Google in 2003. The blogs are hosted by Google and generally accessed from a subdomain of blogspot.com. Blogs can also be served from a custom domain owned by the user (like www.example.com) by using DNS facilities to direct a domain to Google’s servers. A user can have up to 100 blogs per account.

Up until May 1, 2010, Blogger also allowed users to publish blogs to their own web hosting server, via FTP. All such blogs had to be changed to either use a blogspot.com subdomain, or point their own domain to Google’s servers through DNS.

As you may know, even after reading this, well not much is know.

What Does My IP Address Show?

Many people think that every separate computer or mobile device have got their very own IP address, but that’s not quite true nor is saying it tells people what you’re called because it doesn’t, but it does list some of the following that maybe you didn’t expect it to show people that have got your IP.

and it even shows more than that however they are some of the things your IP shows, so once someone has your IP they can find out certain things but even more can be accessed by the police and other law enforcement agencies.

We hope that by reading this short post, you learnt a lot.

By-Passing Website Blocks

We all know what it’s like when your at work or college and you get 5 minutes free, thinking you can quickly check social media but they’ve been blocked by college or work… Its bad, and your thinking to yourself well I’ve not got anything to do right at this minute so why can’t I check my Facebook, right? Well no longer, follow the quick and simple instructions to by-pass the blocks put in place.


  1. Open a new tab and go to KProxy.
  2. Type the website address you want into KProxy, so Facebook.com (For example).
  3. Enter your login details.
  4. Enjoy using social media, by-passing all blocks.

Its that easy, but the organisation wishes it wasn’t!

Enjoy 🙂

Behind The Inner Working’s Of Blogger

We have all heard of Blogger and most of us know that it is currently owner and developed by Google however, blogger was originally owned and operated by a company called Pyra Labs before the service was purchased by Google way back in 2003.

Blogger is used not just by consumers but some companies too and you may also find blogs ran using the service but under the domain name blogspot.com although the service using this domain is exactly the same.

Blogger is written in the Python language and was first launched on 23/08/1999. Although Blogger is still active its use is slowly dwindling and may therefore soon be shut down for good, unless Google do something drastic that is.


We hope you have learnt something by reading this post.

About The Product Serial Number

Nearly everyone has heard of and have seen a product serial number and most of us know that it is basically a product finger print that identifies them specifically however most don’t really know much about them, so in this post we’re going to tell you a bit about them.


A serial number is a unique, identifying number or group of numbers and letters given to an individual piece of hardware or software, passports, bank notes and other documents.

We’ll give you an example… A model number for a Samsung Galaxy S8 will always be Samsung Galaxy S8 and that’s true for every Samsung Galaxy S8 mobile phone therefore the model numbers are identical whilst each of their serial numbers is unique to a specific device.

If your item is stolen but you have got the serial number of that item it means that the police can log the serial number and they happen to come across the exact model as yours and they have reason to check it then they can take a look at the serial number and see if it matches the serial number that you provided them with when you reported that item lost or stolen, they are guaranteed that the item in their possession is yours meaning they can return it to you. So you can understand that even if it seems pointless it is in fact absolutely worth it.


You can see why the product serial number was a brilliant idea and is still used millions if not billions of times globally everyday.

The Real Impact Of GDPR

We’ve all heard about GDPR and what it was set out to do but do we really know its actual impact on the affected areas? Probably not, is the answer which is why we are going to find out.


The lead-up to the effective date of the GDPR led to many companies and websites changing their privacy policies and features worldwide in order to comply with its requirements, and providing email and on-site notification of the changes, despite having had at least two years to prepare and do so. This has been criticized for eventually leading to a form of fatigue among end-users over the excessive numbers of messages. Experts also noted that some reminder emails incorrectly asserted that new consent for data processing had to be obtained for when the GDPR took effect, even though any previously-obtained consent to processing is valid as long as it is properly documented and meets the requirements of the GDPR. Unfortunately the GDPR also meant access to many websites outside of Europe was blocked due to the owners and operators not wanting to comply with the new regulation. Phishing scams also emerged using falsified versions of such emails, and it was also argued that some GDPR notice emails may have actually been sent in violation of anti-spam laws. Mass adoption of GDPR privacy standards by international companies have been cited as an example of the “Brussels effect”, a phenomenon wherein European laws and regulations are used as a global baseline due to their gravitas.


Hopefully the effect of GDPR is now a little bit clearer!

Truth Behind TOR

Anyone that is tech savvy will have heard of the TOR browser, but what do we actually know about the browser itself and what it is used for? Time to find out maybe.....

History

The core principle of Tor, "onion routing", was developed in the mid-1990s by United States Naval Research Laboratory employees, mathematician Paul Syverson, and computer scientists Michael G. Reed and David Goldschlag, with the purpose of protecting U.S. intelligence communications online. Onion routing was further developed by DARPA in 1997.

The alpha version of Tor, developed by Syverson and computer scientists Roger Dingledine and Nick Mathewson and then called The Onion Routing project, or Tor project, launched on 20 September 2002. The first public release occurred a year later. On 13 August 2004, Syverson, Dingledine, and Mathewson presented "Tor: The Second-Generation Onion Router" at the 13th USENIX Security Symposium. In 2004, the Naval Research Laboratory released the code for Tor under a free license, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) began funding Dingledine and Mathewson to continue its development.

In December 2006, Dingledine, Mathewson, and five others founded The Tor Project, a Massachusetts-based research-education nonprofit organization responsible for maintaining Tor. The EFF acted as The Tor Project's fiscal sponsor in its early years, and early financial supporters of The Tor Project included the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Internews, Human Rights Watch, the University of Cambridge, Google, and Netherlands-based Stichting NLnet.

From this period onward, the majority of funding sources came from the U.S. government.

In November 2014 there was speculation in the aftermath of Operation Onymous that a Tor weakness had been exploited. A BBC source cited a "technical breakthrough" that allowed the tracking of the physical locations of servers. In November 2015 court documents on the matter, besides generating serious concerns about security research ethics and the right of not being unreasonably searched guaranteed by the US Fourth Amendment, may also link the law enforcement operation with an attack on Tor earlier in the year.

In December 2015, The Tor Project announced that it had hired Shari Steele as its new executive director. Steele had previously led the Electronic Frontier Foundation for 15 years, and in 2004 spearheaded EFF's decision to fund Tor's early development. One of her key stated aims is to make Tor more user-friendly in order to bring wider access to anonymous web browsing.

In July 2016 the complete board of the Tor Project resigned, and announced a new board, made up of Matt Blaze, Cindy Cohn, Gabriella Coleman, Linus Nordberg, Megan Price, and Bruce Schneier.

What Is TOR Used For

Tor enables its users to surf the Internet, chat and send instant messages anonymously, and is used by a wide variety of people for both licit and illicit purposes. Tor has, for example, been used by criminal enterprises, hacktivism groups, and law enforcement agencies at cross purposes, sometimes simultaneously; likewise, agencies within the U.S. government variously fund Tor (the U.S. State Department, the National Science Foundation, and – through the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which itself partially funded Tor until October 2012 – Radio Free Asia) and seek to subvert it.

Tor is not meant to completely solve the issue of anonymity on the web. Tor is not designed to completely erase tracks but instead to reduce the likelihood for sites to trace actions and data back to the user.

Tor is also used for illegal activities, e.g., to gain access to censored information, to organize political activities, or to circumvent laws against criticism of heads of state.

Operation TOR

Tor aims to conceal its users' identities and their online activity from surveillance and traffic analysis by separating identification and routing. It is an implementation of onion routing, which encrypts and then randomly bounces communications through a network of relays run by volunteers around the globe. These onion routers employ encryption in a multi-layered manner (hence the onion metaphor) to ensure perfect forward secrecy between relays, thereby providing users with anonymity in network location. That anonymity extends to the hosting of censorship-resistant content by Tor's anonymous hidden service feature. Furthermore, by keeping some of the entry relays (bridge relays) secret, users can evade Internet censorship that relies upon blocking public Tor relays.

Because the IP address of the sender and the recipient are not both in cleartext at any hop along the way, anyone eavesdropping at any point along the communication channel cannot directly identify both ends. Furthermore, to the recipient it appears that the last Tor node (called the exit node), rather than the sender, is the originator of the communication.

There is loads more you can learn about TOR.... We may expand on this soon.

Why You Should Always Use A Branded Business Email

If you own a business, did you really think about custom branded email addresses? Companies like Google, Yahoo & AOL offer great email addresses for free, but does it really place your business in the right light? Yeah Gmail is great but when you use an unbranded email address it doesn’t exactly shine you in the right light, because somewhere someone will be asking why you don’t have a branded email such as hello@yourdomain.com… And a lot of the questions will include money and whether you can afford to pay for a branded email, which is more professional and makes both you and your business look better! Have you really thought about it like that?

We hope it helps!